Hashimoto’s vs Hypothyroidism Symptoms

Hashimoto's vs Hypothyroidism Symptoms

Note: The following is the output of a transcription from the video above. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases it is incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors.

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So today we’re going to talk about the question is what are hashimoto’s versus hypothyroid symptoms so this is a person who apparently hasn’t been watching my stuff for very long so we’ll go through it so okay so so hashimoto’s is an autoimmune attack on your thyroid all right so your immune system attacks your thyroid and then it starts creating damage to the ability to make thyroid properly and usually when you get the attack it makes a lot of thyroid hormone makes a lot more thyroid hormone if you’re attacking an enzyme called a thyroid peroxidase enzyme that enzyme works with hydrogen peroxide and it pulls iodine in the system it makes thyroid hormones and when it gets attacked it starts getting crazy and making way more hormone that causes hyper symptoms we’ll talk about that in a second you can also attack the thyroid tissue itself not the enzyme just damage the tissue that just starts as you’ve heard me say a million times vomiting out it just seems like the right word for that just vomiting out a lot of t4 and t3 those are the hormones you get hyper stuff okay but hashimoto’s usually i’d say 85 percent of time or more usually is first a hypothyroid so here’s how it goes you have a thyroid you have a thyroid problem you have a thyroid that’s working normally and then somewhere along the line we get an attack on our thyroid and um and that attack just starts to just starts to attack the thyroid whether it attacks the tissue or whether it attacks the enzyme and it can be very very low-grade attack in the beginning and often is i just i just heard something i think i was listening to a lecture which was citing research that said it takes about seven years for the attack on on the thyroid to start creating um a and a full-blown hashimoto’s symptomatic picture so in other words you can have the attack for like seven years not even though you have it maybe maybe even longer but let’s just use the seven years so now it’s going like this okay and and and so it’s kind of subtly beating up your thyroid if you will okay and and eventually you start getting tissue damage and it’s subtle tissue damage and and you start going into hypothyroid usually first usually go on the hypothyroid sometimes this will all happen at once but you but let’s just keep it simple first you do hypothyroid in other words your thyroid is getting beat up it’s not operating well enough it’s not making enough hormone and you’re tired and your hair is falling out these are hypothyroid symptoms hair falling out tired think slow everything slows down you start getting acid indigestion because your stomach’s not making enough hydrochloric acid because the mechanism has slowed it down that alters your entire digestive system the next thing you have constipation because you have poor chemistry constipation thyroid slows down the the enteric nervous system so that’s the nervous system that makes sure that makes your uh bowels move okay next thing you know you have constipation it creates uh you know creates an inability of your gallbladder to work so all of a sudden maybe you start getting problems of digesting fatty foods maybe that adds to your constipation but now you’re not digesting your fats so now you start getting dry skin because you’re not getting those fats broken down they’re not getting absorbed you can get a slow heartbeat and um and let’s see you know and start putting on weight your metabolism goes down you start putting on weight you can get edema around your ankles so you can get swelling around your ankles because maybe your heart’s not pumping enough maybe your liver is not working well enough and so you can get so everything slows down so you can’t get the liquids back up from your feet all the way up and and these are many of the hypothyroid symptoms now hashimoto’s when you advance the hashimoto’s it’s because there’s a part of reason is the damage now starts to become a lot and you still retain the hypothyroid symptoms but intermittently now when the attack when the attack becomes reaches a threshold i think would be the best way of putting it now all of a sudden you start you start vom again vomiting out a lot of thyroid hormone from the damaged tissue or making too much hormone from damaging this from exacerbating this enzyme that now starts making more hormone now you start to add to the hypothyroid symptoms you start to add heart palpitations because of too much thyroid hormone inward tremors you start to add night sweats because it can affect the hormonal system thyroid has a very direct effect on your hormonal system you start to add insomnia um just because it starts to it fire up your your um starts to fire up your your adrenals that affects your blood sugar so these things start to cause insomnia night sweats inward tremors irritable and there’s a small group of hashimoto’s patients that are hyperthyroid they’re they’re actually more hyper than they are hypo they’re a small group they actually will lose weight and not be able to put it on most hashimoto’s patients will actually put on weight so the bottom line is is that the hypothyroid the diagnosis for hashimoto’s for let’s say you were going to an endocrinologist and and they were going to use a diagnostic code to get paid by the insurance companies for for what they do um then one of the codes is hashimoto’s hypothyroid ditis so it’s it’s you have the immune attack hashimoto’s you have the hypothyroid the slow stuff and then itis means you have an inflammatory issue to the tissues of the of the thyroid itself so you have both so hypothy and and there are people who have hypothyroid without hashimoto’s i keep reading different figures on it the one i read last night was ninety percent of people who have um hypothyroid actually or hashimoto’s which would leave 10 percent who are actually hypothyroid and you’re just gonna have you’re just gonna have the slow the fatigue the hair falling out hair falling out how could i forget that one the hair falling out is a hypothyroid one the weight gain is a hypothyroid one and so that’s so i guess that’s the delineation if there is a delineation it’s more of a it’s more of a spectrum of damage over a period of time and an advancement of damage that then ultimately causes you to go from just hypo into hypo and hyper symptoms and a rare rare occasion just hyper symptoms so it gets it gets it’s it’s that’s i hope that i mean i can see where the confusion comes in for sure and wanting to know what is what and and and that’s why what i just explained is why the confusion comes in so i hope that helps to answer that question you – So today we’re gonna talk about, the question is what are Hashimoto’s versus hypothyroid symptoms? So this is a person who apparently hasn’t been watching my stuff for very long.

(laughs) We’ll go through it. So, okay. So Hashimoto’s is an autoimmune attack on your thyroid. So your immune system attacks your thyroid and then it starts creating damage to the ability to make thyroid properly.

And usually when you get the attack it makes a lot of thyroid hormone. It makes a lot more thyroid hormone if you’re attacking an enzyme called a thyroid peroxidase enzyme. That enzyme works with hydrogen peroxide and it pulls iodine into the system.

It makes thyroid hormones. And when it gets attacked, it starts getting crazy and making way more hormone that causes hyper symptoms. We’ll talk about that in a second. You can also attack the thyroid tissue itself not the enzyme, just damage the tissue.

That just starts as you’ve heard me say a million times, vomiting out, just seems like the right word for that. Just vomiting out a lot of T4 and T3. Those are the hormones you’ll get hyper stuff.

But Hashimoto’s usually, I’d say 85% time or more, usually is first a hypothyroid. So here’s how it goes. You have a thyroid, you have a thyroid problem. You have a thyroid that’s working normally.

And then somewhere along the line, we get an attack on our thyroid, and that attack just starts to attack the thyroid, whether it attacks the tissue or whether it attacks the enzyme. And it can be very, very low grade attack in the beginning, and often is.

I just heard something, I think I was listening to a lecture which was citing research that said, “It’s takes about seven years “for the attack on the thyroid to start creating a full-blown Hashimoto symptomatic picture.

So in other words, you can have the attack for like seven years, not even know you have it. Maybe even longer, but let’s just use the seven years. So now it’s going like this. And so it’s kind of subtly beating up your thyroid if you will.

And eventually, you start getting tissue damage and it’s settled tissue damage, and you start going into hypothyroid. Usually first, usually go on a hypothyroid. Sometimes this will all happen at once but let’s just keep it simple first to do hypothyroid.

In other words, your thyroid is getting beat up. It’s not operating well enough. It’s not making enough hormone. You’re tired and your hair is falling out. These are the hypothyroid symptoms.

Hair falling out, tired, somethings slow. Everything slows down. You start getting acid in digestion because your stomach’s not making enough hydrochloric acid, because the mechanism has slowed down.

That alters your entire digestive system. The next thing you have, constipation because you have poor chemistry, constipation. Thyroids slows down the enteric nervous system. So that’s the nervous system that makes your bowels move.

Next thing you know, you have constipation. It creates an inability of your gallbladder to work. So all of a sudden, maybe you start getting problems of digesting fatty foods. Maybe that adds to your constipation but now you’re not digesting your fats.

So now you start getting dry skin because you’re not getting those fats broken down. They’re not getting absorbed. You can get a slow heartbeat and let’s see, and start putting on weight. Your metabolism goes down, you start putting on weight.

You can get edema around your ankles. So you can get swelling around your ankles because maybe your heart’s not pumping enough. Maybe your liver’s not working well enough. So everything slows down.

So you can’t get the liquids back up from your feet all the way up. And these are many of the hypothyroid symptoms. Now Hashimoto’s, when you advance the Hashimoto’s, it’s because there’s a part, there’s the damage now, starts to become a lot.

And you still retain the hypothyroid symptoms but intermittently now, when the attack reaches a threshold, I think it would be the best way of putting it. Now, all of a sudden, you start (vocalizes). You start vomiting out a lot of thyroid hormone from the damaged tissue, or making too much hormone from exacerbating this enzyme, that now starts making more hormone.

Now you start to add to the hypothyroid symptoms. You start to add heart palpitations because it’s too much thyroid hormone, inward tremors. You start to add night sweats because again it affect the hormonal system.

Thyroid has a very direct effect on your hormonal system. You start to add insomnia just because it starts to fire up your adrenals that affects your blood sugar. So these things start to cause insomnia and night sweats and work tremors are irritable.

And there’s a small group of Hashimoto’s patients that are hyperthyroid. They’re actually more hyper than they are hypo. They’re a small group. They actually will lose weight and not be able to put it on.

Most Hashimoto’s patients will actually put on weight. So the bottom line is, is that the hypothyroid… The diagnosis for Hashimoto’s, for let’s say, you are going to an endocrinologist and they were gonna use a diagnostic code to get paid by the insurance companies for what they do.

Then one of the codes is, Hashimoto’s, hypothyroiditis. So you have the immune attack, Hashimoto’s. You have the hypothyroid, the slow stuff. And then itis means you have an inflammatory issue to the tissues of the thyroid itself.

So you have both. And there’re people who have hyperthyroid without Hashimoto’s. I keep reading different figures on it. The one I read last night was 90% of people have hypothyroid actually Hashimoto’s which would leave 10% who were actually hypothyroid.

And you’re just gonna have the slow, the fatigue, the hair falling out. How could I forget that one. Their hair falling out is a hypothyroid one. The weight gain is a hypothyroid one. And so I guess that’s the delineation.

If there is a delineation, it’s more of a spectrum of damage over a period of time, and an advancement of damage that then ultimately causes you to go from just hypo into hypo and hyper symptoms and a rare, rare occasion, just hyper symptoms.

I can see where the confusion comes in for sure. And wanting to know what is what, and that’s why, what I just explained is why the confusion comes in. So I hope that helps to answer that question.

Source : Youtube

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