Exercise and Hashimoto’s

Exercise and Hashimoto's

Note: The following is the output of a transcription from the video above. Although the transcription is largely accurate, in some cases it is incomplete or inaccurate due to inaudible passages or transcription errors.

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Dr. Martin Rutherford here today and today we’re going to talk about exercise now i full disclosure i’m sure i’ve talked about this at some point in time because it’s such a significant part of exercise relative to hashimoto’s relative to immunological aspects of disease in general so in other words i get a lot of people to come in here with autoimmunities of all kinds and this ongoing series that we’re doing right now is is all about hashimoto’s and and and and we usually pick these topics according to what people are asking for but also according to what i’m seeing and i see a lot of trends i see a lot of new patients i interview a lot of people i’ve seen a lot of new patients and that and the latest trend i’m seeing is people taking more responsibility for themselves at least the ones that are calling here and they’re taking they’re doing that they’re trying the different diets they’re off the gluten they’re taking the they’re taking their seleniums and they’re taking a methionine and they’re taking the zinc and they’re taking the magnesiums and everything and and they’ve probably gotten some improvement um but obviously they’re not getting what they want out of it so they call so they call someone like me and and and so um one of the big things i’ve seen lately is people going okay i gotta exercise exercises exercise is good and i probably have done something like this online already and uh but and and if i did what i said was yeah but too much exercise is not good so i wanted to go over a little um a little study that was just done and it was a study out of europe and it was just last year and the study was on the immunological aspects of exercise in chronic disease and interestingly enough they specifically talked about hashimoto’s thyroiditis in this study understand all you hashimoto’s sufferers you have the you now have officially had the number one autoimmune condition in the entire world talking to people from australia talking to people from the united arabs emirates i’ve talked to people all over and it is it’s there and their doctors don’t know what to do with it either so there’s a lot of different things relative to fixing or putting these problems in the remission keeping in the remission and really what i do is lifestyle right it’s lifestyle it’s it’s it’s nutrients nutraceuticals and its diet and better but within the framework of that there’s about 40 different things you need to look at exercise is a big one because here’s the deal what they found is that a certain level of exercise is really really excellent for autoimmune disease in general we i we may have always kind of intuitively known it’s good for your immune system and balancing out your immune system in general but this this uh study took a number of people and i i think it was like 180 people and measured outcomes measured lifestyle outcomes um but also measured specific uh chemistry relative to immune function and this particular some of this particular chemistry um was relative to hashimoto’s now what they found some of it’s not going to surprise you first of all they found that it keeps your your your immune system and your metabolic system in balance when you do enough exercise but not too much exercise we’ll get into the too much later but if you do enough and you don’t exceed your metabolic capacity which i’ll tell you what that means in a minute then it shows that it improves physiological outcomes in other words in other words you’re able to function better during the day you’re able to you’re able to think better you’re able to move better you’re able to do those types of things more importantly it improves psychological outcomes they did psychological testing on uh on these participants relative to anxiety relative to depression relative to um uh panic attacks and things of that nature and they found and they found that these outcome measures improved by um 25 35 45 and and i must tell you they they were not you know they were not the the lifestyle changes were relative to um um just exercise just exercise in in and and a person doing maybe maybe 20 or 30 minutes worth of walking a day because that was pretty much what they asked people to do so um they they also i know now i’m not sure how they came to this conclusion and i read the whole article and it’s like several pages long but they did come to the conclusion that it’s cancer preventative and that if you have cancer that it improves the recurrence rates of cancer by you doing exercises well makes sense if they’re saying that all of these markers that are inflammatory markers immune exacerbating markers in the blood are all improving then it would make sense that it could um give you a a better shot of of not getting cancer even if you have genetically you know proven cancer lines in your family obviously you probably have to do a little bit more than exercise but really they isolated that out and and the only factor that they evaluated in this in this study was was exercise okay and then the biggest thing that caught my eye that made me want to do this was um it it just decreased immune inflammation it decreased inflammatory markers across the board some of you may be familiar with markers of like called c-reactive protein so that’s a big marker today especially in the cardiac world it’s a marker that means you’re getting an inflammatory response and if you’re getting an inflammatory response of so such and such a severity then it increases your risk for getting heart disease by uh like a ton like 40 50 or something like that and the way it works is is there’s these in this inflammation takes place the inflammation starts damaging the inside arteries of your heart and in this particular study they study the heart but it can also be stroke and and um that it can make you more susceptible to and that showed that a moderate amount of exercise decreased your ability to decrease your or increase your ability to decrease your c-reactive protein which goes through heart disease but it also goes to not flaring up autoimmunity particularly autoimmunity particularly we’re talking about hashimoto’s right now but specific to hashimoto’s tnf alpha went down il-6 went down and about six other markers that are all inflammatory markers okay when you when you when you get those antibody tests back they tell you that you have hashimoto’s your thyroid peroxidase antibodies particularly and your anti-thyroglobulin antibodies what their antibodies they’re not destroying your thyroid they’re telling these guys to destroy your thyroid the tnf alphas the il-6s and those types of things these are white blood cells that are good until they’re out of control and when they get out of control they cause inflammation so the so proper exercise dampen them dampens them i go back to the reason i’m doing this one is because suddenly i’m treating people who are triathletes i’m treating people who want to who are who are cross-country marathon runners i’m just treating people that are going to the gym and doing high-intensity exercises and and all of those well not all of us though those are extreme okay that particularly like the triathletes and the and the bicyclists who bicycle hundreds of miles and um i mean i i’m at the foot of the sierras here so so a lot of people train here olympians train here and i’m getting a lot of these folks who have hashimoto’s and who have other other neuroinflammatory diseases and autoimmune diseases and it’s kind of hard to say you know what that’s a little too much and when you interview that person they they all say the same thing they say i want you to help me to be able to better do this without crashing well i’m not sure that’s going to happen in those cases because what the study showed was that if you over exercise you crash and all these things flare up when they flare up it’s heart palpitations anxiety panic attacks depression it’s joint pain it’s it’s it’s but it’s fatigue oh my god it’s fatigue they’re down for days and then you know and so it’s that mindset of mores better than i’m trying to break here now so exercise is good up to a certain point and you have to find out what that point of duration and intensity is and the way you find out is you pick it pick it pick an exercise let’s say it’s walking and let’s say you actually have time on your hands enough to walk for let’s say an hour okay pick an exercise and walk for an hour you don’t crash if you don’t go home if you’re if you’re not like oh my god i can’t do anything else for two or three days then you have not exceeded your capacity and you can do an hour if you’re so inclined to do more do more until you get that reaction and then you’re going to know that that’s too much exercise and you have to back down all right i mean in general 20 30 minutes of exercise is good enough for my patients but again i’m running into a lot of people who are now they’re in the gym they’re doing circuit training they’re doing all kinds of things and it’s and and it’s flaring them up then when i do the lifestyle aspect of my recommendations to them um many are relieved that they don’t have to go out and kill themselves and and unfortunately the ones who are not relieved are really not relieved they’re just kind of like no you know that’s like what makes me happy except for the three days that they’re laying in bed with all these symptoms and fatigue and can’t do anything so that’s um the immunological aspects of exercising basically in chronic disease and chronic inflammatory diseases but it’s very specific to hashimoto’s it’s a it’s a topic i cover with like all my hashimoto’s patients and and they get it you know especially once they start to implement it they start to get how much that is one piece of their puzzle for sure so that is exercise and hashimoto’s uh and that’s kind of like the updated uh official actually research done type of type of a data that i think a lot of the people out there that are watching a lot of you out there watching would like to have all right you – Rutherford here today.

And today we’re going to talk about exercise. Now I, full disclosure, I’m sure I’ve talked about this at some point in time. Cause it’s such a significant part of exercise relative to Hashimoto’s, relative to immunological aspects of disease in general.

So in other words, I get a lot of people that come in here, with auto immunities of all kinds. And this ongoing series that we’re doing right now, is all about Hashimoto’s. And, we usually pick these topics, according to what people are asking for but also according to what I’m seeing.

And I see a lot of trends, I see a lot of new patients. I interview a lot of people. I’ve seen a lot of new patients. And the latest trends I’m seeing, is people taking more responsibility for themselves.

At least the ones that are calling here. And they’re doing it. They’re trying the different diets. They’re off the gluten. They’re taking the seleniums and they’re taking the Methanone and they’re taking the zinc.

And they’re taking the magnesiums and everything. And, they probably gotten some improvement but obviously they’re not getting what they want out of it. So they call, someone like me. And, so one of the things I’ve seen lately is, people going, “Okay I got to exercise.

” Exercise is good. And I probably have done something like this online already. And, if I did what I said was, yeah but too much exercise is not good. So I wanted to go over a little study that was just done.

And it was a study out of Europe, and, it was just last year. And the study was on the immunological aspects, of exercise in chronic disease. And interestingly enough, they specifically talked about Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in this study.

Understand, all you Hashimoto’s sufferers. You have the… You now have, officially have, the number one, autoimmune condition in the entire world. Talking to people from Australia, talking to people from the United Arab Emirates, I’ve talked to.

.. We were all over and it is, it’s there. And their doctors don’t know what to do with it either. So there’s a lot of different things, relative to fixing or putting these problems in the remission, keeping into remission.

And really what I do is lifestyle, right? It’s lifestyle. It’s, nutrients, nutraceuticals and it’s diet and but within the framework of that there’s about, 40 different things you need to look at.

Exercise is a big one, because here’s the deal. What they found is that a certain level of exercise, is really excellent for autoimmune disease in general. We may have always kind of intuitively known, it’s good for your immune system and balancing out your immune system in general.

But this, study took a number of people. And I think it was like 180 people and measured outcomes, measured lifestyle outcomes but also measured specific chemistry relative to immune function. And this.

.. Some of this particular chemistry, was relative to, Hashimoto’s. Now what they found, some of it’s not going to surprise you. First of all, they found that it keeps your immune system and your metabolic system in balance.

When you do enough exercise but not too much exercise. We’ll get into the too much later. But if you do enough and you don’t exceed, your metabolic capacity. Which I’ll tell you what that means in a minute.

Then it shows that it improves physiological outcomes. In other words, you’re able to function better, during the day. You’re able to think better. You’re able to move better. You’re able to do those types of things.

More importantly, it improves psychological outcomes. They did psychological testing on these participants, relative to anxiety, relative to depression, relative to Panic attacks and things of that nature.

And they found that these outcome measures improved by 25, 35, 45%. And, I must tell you, they were not… The lifestyle changes were relative to, just exercise. And a person doing maybe maybe 20 or 30 minutes, worth of walking a day.

Because that was pretty much what they asked people to do. So, they also … Now, I’m not sure how they came to this conclusion. And I read the whole article and it’s like several pages long, but they did come to the conclusion that it’s cancer preventative, and that if you’ve had cancer, that it improves the recurrence rates of cancer by you doing exercises.

Well, it makes sense if they’re saying that, all of these markers that are inflammatory markers, immune exacerbating markers in the blood are all improving, then it would make sense that it could give you a better shot of not getting cancer.

Even if you have genetically, proven cancer lines in your family, obviously you probably have to do a little bit more than exercise, but really they isolated that out. And the only factor that they evaluated, in this study was exercise, okay? And then the biggest thing that caught my eye, that made me want to do this was it just decreased immune inflammation.

It decreases inflammatory markers across the board. Some of you may be familiar with ,markers , called C reactive protein. So that’s a big market today especially in the cardiac world. It’s a marker.

That means you’re getting an inflammatory response. (engine revving) And if you’re getting any inflammatory responses, such as severity , then it increases your risk for getting heart disease by like a ton.

Like 40, 50% or something like that. And the way it works is, there’s this information takes place. The information starts damaging the inside arteries of your heart. And in this particular study, they studied the heart but it can also be stroke.

And, that can make you more susceptible to. And that showed that a moderate amount of exercise, decreased your ability to decrease your… Increase your ability (chuckles) to decrease your C-reactive protein.

Which goes through heart disease, but it also goes to not flaring up auto-immunity. Particularly auto-immunity, particularly we’re talking about Hashimoto’s right now but specific the Hashimoto’s TNF alpha went down, IL6 went down and about six other markers.

They’re all inflammatory markers, okay? When you, get those antibody test back, they tell you that you have Hashimoto’s, your thyroid peroxidase antibodies, particularly and your antithyroglobulin antibodies.

What, their antibodies, they’re not destroying your thyroid. They’re telling these guys, (laughs) to destroy your thyroid. The TNF, alphas, the IL6es and those types of things. These are white blood cells that are good, until they’re out of control.

And when they get out of control, they cause inflammation. So, proper exercise, dampens them. I go back to the reason I’m doing this one is because, suddenly I’m treating people who are triathletes.

I’m treating people who want to, who are, cross-country marathon runners. I’m just treating people that are going to the gym and doing high intensity exercises. And, all of those, well, not all those.

Those are extreme, okay? Particularly like the triathletes and the bicyclists who bicycle hundreds of miles. And I mean, I’m at the foot of the Sierras here. So, a lot of people train here, Olympians train here and I’m getting a lot of these folks, who have Hashimoto’s and who have other other neuro-inflammatory diseases and autoimmune diseases and (exhales sharply).

It’s kind of hard to say, you know what? That’s a little too much. And when you interview that person, they all say the same thing. They say, I want you to help me to be able to better do this without crashing.

Well, I’m not sure it’s going to happen in those cases because what the study showed was that if you overexercise you crash. And all these things (whistles) flare up. When they flare up, it’s heart palpitations, anxiety, panic attacks, depression.

It’s joint pain, it’s fatigue. Oh my God, it’s fatigue. They’re down for days. And then… And, and so it’s that mindset of more’s better, than I’m trying to break here. Now, so exercise is good, up to a certain point and you have to find out what that point of, duration and intensity is.

And the way you find out, is you pick an exercise, let’s say it’s walking. And let’s say, you actually have time on your hands, enough to walk for, let’s say an hour, okay? Pick an exercise and walk for an hour.

You don’t crash, if you don’t go home, if you’re not like, “Oh my God, I can’t do anything else for two or three days.” Then you have not exceeded your capacity. You can do an hour.

If you’re so inclined to do more, do more, until you get that reaction. And then you’re going to know that that’s too much exercise and you have to back down. All right, I mean, in general, 20, 30 minutes of exercise, is good enough for my patients.

But again, I’m running into a lot of people, who are now, they’re in the gym, they’re doing circuit training, they’re doing all kinds of things and it’s flaring them up. Then when I get to do the lifestyle aspect of my recommendations to them, many are relieved (laughs) that they don’t have to go out and kill themselves.

And, unfortunately the ones we’re not relieved, are really not relieved. They’re just kinda like, “No, you know, that’s like what makes me happy.” Except for the three days that they’re laying in bed, with all these symptoms of fatigue and can’t do anything.

So that’s the immunological aspects of, exercising, basically, a chronic disease and chronic inflammatory diseases. But it’s very specific to Hashimoto’s. It’s a topic I cover with like, all my Hashimoto’s patients and they get it.

Especially once they start to implement it, they start to get how much that is one piece, of their puzzle, for sure. So that is exercise and Hashimoto’s, and, that’s kind of like the updated official, actually, research done type of data that I think, a lot of the people out there that are watching, a lot of you out there watching would like to have.

All right.

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